A Call To Action! Our Veterans Need Us!

By: Elissa Meininger – Health Policy Analyst

“America’s veterans deserve the very best health care because they’ve earned it.”  Jim Ramstad, U.S. Congressman

My husband died eight years ago and I took the opportunity to go on a journey of self-discovery that, for a time, led me to Austin, Texas, and then back home to Oklahoma City.

Within days of returning home, I learned that an old political buddy, Bill Duncan, was in town, doing something interesting.   So who is Bill Duncan, you ask? He’s the fellow my Fifth District US Congressman, Ernest Istook, hired in 1995 to clean up the medical system.

Clean Up?

At the time, I served as head of Ross Perot’s Reform Party Health Committee so this gave me a good reason to pay attention to what was going on with Bill.  Reformers were in the business of finding ways to clean up government. A third of Bill’s job was to make sure the new Office of Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health wouldn’t get screwed up.

When the NIH Director attacked it, Bill created the legislation, passed by Senator Tom Harkin, that created the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). It’s very existence was as welcome as ants at a picnic because our American medical system is based on using drugs, surgery and other high tech (read expensive) modes of treating illness and injury.

Allopathy?  What’s THAT?

Technically, the medical philosophy that our medical establishment practices is called “allopathy”.  Consequently, the CAM department had many enemies, and still does. As an economist by training, Bill’s overall assignment was to make the U.S. healthcare system more effective, more efficient, and less expensive. His doctorate is in political science, economics, and public law, but he also has an MBA from Boston University.

In his program, which he took in Germany, Harvard professors came to Germany and taught the program from Harvard’s books.  This gave him a great basis for understanding the mandate from Rep. Istook. This included reducing regulatory burdens, increasing market availability of affordable health insurance, and driving new and effective treatments and technologies, including ones with no patent, into use.

The fight over proper health care in the US has been around for a VERY long time…

Continue reading A Call To Action! Our Veterans Need Us!

If I Could Address Autism One….

If I spoke at Autism One This Year, this is what I would say…

Opinion by KP Stoller, MD, www.incurable-me.com

Autism One is a nonprofit, parent-driven organization that provides education and supports advocacy efforts for children and families touched by an autism diagnosis.  This year it is being held from May 24th through the 28th, 2017 at the Hotel Elegante in Colorado Springs, CO.

They hold a conference once a year and it has been almost a decade since I last spoke at one of them, but I have a hankering to speak again because after all these years, and all the real science that has come to the fore, we are no closer to preventing the so-called autism epidemic then we were a decade ago.

But we COULD be…

I was tied up, this year, on a million different projects, and I forgot to put my name in to be a speaker for the Autism One conference in time to get on the speaker list – so they have me on the back-up list, in case someone can’t make it.  So I MIGHT see you there.

But, be there, or not, here’s what I’d tell you…

Continue reading If I Could Address Autism One….

My BANNED TEDx Talk…

KP Stoller, MD  www.incurable-me.com

I’ve been banned in Albuquerque…

For those who don’t know what TED talks are, TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, often in the form of short, talks (18 minutes or less).   TEDx talks are usually 9 minutes or less, but are independently run.

My Santa Fe PR person,  helping me launch my book Incurable Me, nominated me to give a talk in Albuquerque, New Mexico on the “Future of Medicine”  (February 16th, 2017) to help answer the question…

 “What if New Mexico was the best place to practice medicine?”

An interesting question because New Mexico is ranked the #1 worst place to practice medicine by a 2016 Medscape survey. Given that

the local sponsors were the University of New Mexico Health Science Center (UNM-HSC) and Presbyterian Healthcare Services I was pleasantly surprised that I had been selected to speak.

At one point in my career (as a New Mexico physician), I had been on the adjunct clinical faculty at UNM-HSC, but my appointment was not renewed soon after my attempts to get the NM  Board of Pharmacy to scrutinize the legality of injecting the mercury preservative Thimerosal in vaccines into citizens violating the State’s Drug Act. There were a few provisions in the Act about banning adulterants that have no safety testing, but the Board of Pharmacy didn’t have the backbone to enforce the law.

At Odds…

I was always at logger heads with the medical directors (gate-keepers) at Presbyterian, because they would frequently deny my patients coverage for hyperbaric oxygen therapy and we would always meet up at various appeal hearings. They must have spent 1000 times more in legal fees than what  my patients requested in reimbursement. But to them “off-label” Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) was on their list of things they could deny and so they did so regardless of the circumstances, regardless of the cost to the patient, and regardless that it helped our mutual patients.

I treated a man 9 months out from a carbon monoxide exposure and he made stellar improvements in his functionality.

 

Continue reading My BANNED TEDx Talk…

Traumatic Brain Injury and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy…

K. Paul Stoller, MD, FACHM  www.incurable-me.com

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K. P. Stoller MD in front of a Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber

Chief of Hyperbaric Medicine, Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy  San Francisco  www.hbotsf.org

 

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Hyperbaric chambers come in all sizes

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) saturates the body’s tissues with oxygen using a pressure vessel.  HBOT is most often recognized as the treatment for De-Compression Sickness (DCS) or “the bends.”

DCS causes significant neurological injury and post initial injury. The dysfunctional changes are virtually identical to those caused by trauma.  Thus oxygen under pressure has been used to treat neurological injuries since 1937, almost eighty years.

No one has found a replacement or substitute treatment for the bends that works as well as oxygen.  HBOT results in a 95 percent acute treatment cure rate for DCS in all of the navies of the world.

Combining HBOT with other therapies that help brain-injured patients enhances the effect of those treatments and makes these other therapies less costly, while creating additional recovery in any given patient.

An increase of one-half atmosphere will raise the oxygen levels in plasma seven times to twelve times normal (700 percent to 1,200 percent). Under this increased pressure, oxygen acts like a drug- and DNA-signaling agent. This treatment’s mechanisms of action simply follow the general gas laws for saturating liquids with a gas, similar to the way Sodastream® saturates water with carbon dioxide.

No one yet has found a substitute for oxygen in human physiological processes, and any injury caused by a lack of oxygen can be expected to benefit from HBOT with the right oxygen dosage.  Saturating with oxygen is a safe procedure when all of the correct protocols are followed, and significant side effects are extremely rare.

The History of Hyperbaric Medicine…

The history of hyperbaric medicine reaches back to the year 1620 when Drebbel developed a one-atmosphere diving bell, and forty years later Boyle joined forces with Gay-Lussac to develop the general gas law.

Continue reading Traumatic Brain Injury and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy…